Norfolk is a long way away from anywhere, and if I were you, I shouldn't start from here. By the time you get to the outskirts of Cromer, any distinctions between science, beachcombing, social commentary, writing and animal husbandry have started to blur. When the process is complete, you know you've arrived at the End Of The Pier Show. So, welcome. Find somewhere to park your unicycle. Pull up a girrafe chair. Make yourself comfortable.

Saturday, March 14, 2009

Same Blog, Different Pier?

I've had a blog over at Nature Networks for a long time. But now I feel that my work there is done, and that there's change in the wind. Should I stay at Nature Networks, or take the End Of The Pier Show to a new town?

10 comments:

  1. I don't know, but I've subscribed here just in case! I will not comment in a public venue about some of my recent irritations, continuing since our three-way discussion on Monday, but you may have noticed them!

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  2. I've deliberately kept well out of it all, Maxine, so am trying to see things positively. My main brood about NN - at least the one I'll admit to in public - is the fact that one must - register before one makes comments. I think this puts people off and contributes to a feeling over over-clubbishness.

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  3. For outsiders NN does seem clubby, but I've been wondering if the club might be a nice one to be in. I got an invitation to post there a while back but didn't take it up, and I've been wondering if I'm missing a valuable experience.

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  4. This clubbishness thing is funny. It never actually really struck me as such when I looked at NN the very first time, not too long ago: so you have to sign up to comment.. so what? It's absolutely worth it.

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  5. @ Rosie - if you've been invited to blog on NN, then go for it. It really is a very pleasant place to be , and I have made lots of friends there. I haven't severed my links with it: my blog there will remain under its new title 'I Editor'. There are many reasons for setting up here, and I don't want to discuss them all. However, apart from the clubbiness, I've thought for a while that my blog on NN really ought to be more professional than personal, and I should do the fun stuff off-site.

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  6. Reading this, and the post on 'I Editor', I feel bad that my posts and comments on NN have been declining in their scientific content. In particular, I'm sorry that I succumbed to the temptation to write an utterly non-scientific post about, and post photos of, my album collection.

    I'm limited somewhat by legal concerns as to the academic and science topics I can write about on my NN blog: I can't write about or show any of the anatomical specimens, and I can't write about specific student or colleague interactions. All of the experiments and science writing that I do are in collaboration with others, so I can't post about those, and I can't post photos of my lab equipment, cell cultures, data, or mice. However, there are plenty of other science topics about which I can write, some of which are directly related to my recent trip to England. So I'll get on with it ....

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  7. I've subscribed to this one too.

    For me, it just feels freer and more flexible out in the Blogger world. I still keep the NN blog for very occasional very sciency thing, but as most of my blogging tends to be about writing/living, it just seems to fit better here.

    Personally, knowing your blog I would take the step out into the big wide world. But I would keep on the NN blog (perhaps renamed the Fallen into the Sea Pier Show) for occasions when you want to do a particularly techie post...

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  8. Henry, if you want some photoshopped designs for your banner here, email me the photo (or another one) without text and I'll funk it up a bit, if you like.

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  9. For me, the registration at Nature Network is a big advantage. A platform like nature.com attracts a massive amount of traffic, and a "brand" like the Nature brand attracts all sorts and kinds - many of whom one would not want to see anywhere. The registration system helps to filter out this unwelcome noise, spam and other types. To me, it does make sense to ask people to register (for free) before they can comment.

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  10. Wow, I space out for a few days and look what happens! Subscribed. I too have split my professional and personal blogging in two, though I am conflicted about it - I mean, if we are trying to humanize science, then is it really a good thing to sterilize our professional blogs? I haven't figured it out myself.

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